SpaceX founder fears ‘evil dictators’ will use artificial intelligence to attack the West

The Billionaire, who also runs a not-for-profit artificial intelligence research company, warned that the futuristic technology could be deadly if it falls into the wrong hands.

He has previously said that the research company, OpenAI, wants to “contract large corporations who may gain too much power by owning super-intelligence systems devoted to profits, as well as governments which may use AI to gain power and even oppress their citizens” but has extended that warning further.

Speaking to Sam Altman, co-chairman of OpenAI, he claimed that countries would attempt to steal control away from its owner.

However, Mr Musk reassured the public that AI technology would not develop a mind of its own and attack like scenes fictionalised in science fiction hit Terminator.

The billionaire said: “I do want to empathise that this is something that I advocate, it’s not prescriptive, this is simply hopefully predictive.

“People will say this is something I want to occur, instead of something that is probably the best of the available alternatives.

“The best of the available alternatives that I can come up with – and maybe someone could come up with a better approach or better outcome – is that we achieve democratisation of AI technology.

“Meaning no one company or small set of individuals has control over advance AI technology.

“That’s very dangerous, it could also get stolen by somebody bad, like some evil dictator or country could send their intelligence agency to go steal it and gain control.

“It just becomes a very unstable situation where I think if you’ve got any incredibly powerful AI, you just don’t know who’s going to control that.

“It’s not that I think the risk is the AI would develop a world of its own, the concern is that someone may use it in a way that is bad.”

This comes as research suggests millions of Britons fear robots will take over the world and destroy the human race.

Almost six in 10 UK adults have concerns the impact of artificially intelligent robots on mankind and four in 10 think humanoids could destroy humanity.

Professor Noel Sharkey, Emeritus Professor of AI and Robotics, at the University of Sheffield, was a consultant on the study.

He said: “The robotics community has certainly been considering the idea that robots will be walking among us and it’s just a matter of when really.

“We are likely to see robots integrated into society in the near future as shop assistants, receptionists, doctors, bar tenders and also as carers for our elderly and children.

“It’ll all happen very gradually over the next 20 to 30 years until we don’t even notice they’re among us.

“I don’t think there’s anything to be concerned about but if they come to look too human-like, they could be used to deceive us in many ways.”

Daily Express :: Weird Feed